Researching Women in WWII

Learn about the resources available to trace women’s service across all military branches. Some of the links provided here will be WWII specific.

Articles

The Forgotten Horror of Ravensbrück, The Nazi Concentration Camp for Women

General Resources

Legends of the Flight Nurses of WWII

Minerva Center

National Archives – National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis (Personnel Records, Morning Reports, Payroll Records, Army Air Corps IDPFs and more)

National Archives – Women’s Research Guide

National Women’s History Museum

National World War II Museum – Women at War

Remember the Women Institute

Rutgers Oral History Archive

Sarah Lawrence College Archives: A War Scrapbook

Smithsonian Life on the Home Front – browse this educational section for other lessons that feature women

What Did Grandma Do in the War?

Women Come To the Front

Women in Military Service For America Memorial

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Important News on How We Provide WWII Education

Evaluating our business over the last decade, especially the last six years in which we have provided a tremendous amount of WWI and WWII educational materials, we have decided to change how and where we provide education for military research. Our focus has also shifted in how we help clients with research, processing what is discovered, and writing. While we still provide the highest quality military research available, your options for education now change. What does this mean for you?

WWII Research & Writing Center Website

On this website, the Educational Articles and Videos will remain. We will continue to add articles that help you dig deep into your family and military history. All of our research books will remain and we will continue to update them as records access changes.

Other resources have been moved or removed permanently.

WWII Education Website

This is our online course and webinar website. There are several online military research classes available. Several...

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Researching the OSS in WWII

There are many ways to locate information on OSS members during World War II. Start by requesting their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. Then look for other personnel files at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Search for OSS specific mission reports and other materials at the archives. If the OSS member was Killed In Action or still considered Missing In Action, request their Individual Deceased Personnel File. Investigate online and offline resources. The suggestions and links presented here will get you started on your research. There are many more resources available.

Ask me how I can help you with our WWII research or writing projects.

U.S. Resources

CIA - The OSS and the London "Free Germans"

History of WWII Infiltrations into France

This PDF has a huge list of websites, books, and a table of information. Not to be overlooked as a resource!

Office of Strategic Services Society

U.S. National Archives OSS...

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Why Military Research Is Not Free

I've spent more than 20 years in the genealogy and military research communities and have observed many shifts in the way we research our family's histories. Often the shifts have come in the way records have become accessible. Primarily through online subscription websites. There are many researchers who believe those records should be free and you can do it all yourself without ever hiring a professional researcher. This is not always possible.

For the last five plus years, the accessibility of World War I, World War II, and Korean War records has changed significantly, especially when we talk about the Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF) or service files. No longer do you have to be the next-of-kin to receive these records if the soldier died or was discharged by today's date 62 years ago. However, in cases of researching the Army or Army Air Corps/Army Air Forces or Air Force, just sending in Form 180 will not get you all the answers, especially if the service file burned....

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When NOT to Hire a Genealogy or Military Record Retrieval Person

First, I would like to define a couple of things so readers understand where I am coming from.

Record retriever: Someone who will copy or scan specific records requested by a client, usually based off an 'Add to cart' option of specific, non-flexible record requests. This person may or may not have any idea how to reconstruct military histories because they specialize in pulling specific records only. Usually they do not provide context for the records or explain what they mean. Their job is to obtain records for a client only.

Full service researcher: Someone who obtains various records, customized to a client's specific needs, questions, concerns, and project, to reconstruct military service. This type of researcher provides a fully sourced research report with the documents that show military service. Often you can also request trip planning suggestions if you wish to travel in Europe in your soldier's footsteps. Some firms, like mine, have a network of tour guides and...

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Professional Researchers and Empathy

Happy almost New Year!

The end of 2018 has arrived, although I am not quite sure where this year went. While there were moments it felt as if it dragged on and I would never see the light at the end of the tunnel, most days seemed to fly by. As I sit here in these final hours of the year, I have been journaling a lot about my targets for the early part of 2019. I have been evaluating my business, what it has been, what it can no longer be, and what it must become. Who I must become to create in a new way.

I am writing my memoir and a couple of other books at the same time because the world requires hope and inspiration. I require an outlet for some of what I have experienced and felt. I was also put on this earth to help others discover new possibilities to cope with the unknown and difficult. This is requiring me to be very vulnerable and open. Something that is sometimes difficult.

The research we, as professionals, do for people can have serious repercussions in their lives and...

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Are You Accurately Reconstructing WWII Military Service?

 

I am often asked how to reconstruct a military service file. In this short video I talk about this. Be sure to scroll down to see the additional resources to help you accurately reconstruct military history. You might be surprised to discover reconstruction is not what a lot of people tell you it is.

[embed]https://youtu.be/pn3nISXXn3M[/embed]

Additional Resources

Pick up one of our research books on Kindle or Paperback from Amazon. We have the only books on the market that teach you how to research any 20th century war. The strategies, records, and tools that we teach you for WWII research apply to WWI, Korea, and Vietnam.

Take one of our online courses available at WWII Education.

Educational Articles on Research

Videos

© 2018 World War II Research & Writing Center

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Can We Stop the Stigma of History?

 

The weekend of 14-16 September 2018 I was in Son, Netherlands for the Operation Market Garden (OMG) commemorations and living history for the 101st Airborne. Coming up this weekend in Arnhem, they will be commemorating the British aspect of OMG. As I was in the Airborne re-enactment camp, I spoke to many Dutch people about the stigma of war that still exists in society and families today. I spoke to many about the past, the choices that were made, and how we heal in the present and move forward.

My point of view is, the past is not all black and white or right or wrong or good or bad. It just isn’t one or the other. We live in a completely different time, our way of life is completely different than those who lived through WWII (or any other time period for that matter.) It is not ours to judge the past but to observe, research, understand, see the choices that were made in circumstances we cannot imagine. We were not there so who are we to judge?

What would it take for the...

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